Une auberge pour les admirateurs de Jane Austen, et bien plus encore...
 
AccueilFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 La scene la plus romantique des romans

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Louise B.
Beautiful pianoforte
avatar

Nombre de messages : 695
Age : 34
Localisation : Sandpoort Noord
Date d'inscription : 21/11/2006

MessageSujet: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Lun 14 Mai 2007 - 14:40

Bien sur vous pouvez en choisir plusieurs dans les romans. Je parle des scenes qui font battre votre coeur quand vous les lisez dans le livre, vous attendrissent, vous etonne.

S&S: Faudra que je relise. Je me souviens plus.

P&P: Les deux demandes en mariage et particulierement ces phrases dans la deuxieme

Citation :
The happiness which this reply produced was such as he had probably never felt before, and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do. Had Elizabeth been able to encounter his eyes, she might have seen how well the expression of heartfelt delight diffused over his face became him; but, though she could not look, she could listen, and he told her of feelings which, in proving of what importance she was to him, made his affection every moment more valuable.
They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.

MP: J'aime ces deux passages ou Edmund devient amoureux de Fanny.

Citation :
Loving, guiding, protecting her, as he had been doing ever since her being ten years old, her mind in so great a degree formed by his care, and her comfort depending on his kindness, an object to him of such close and peculiar interest, dearer by all his own importance with her than any one else at Mansfield, what was there now to add, but that he should learn to prefer soft light eyes to sparkling dark ones. And being always with her, and always talking confidentially, and his feelings exactly in that favourable state which a recent disappointment gives, those soft light eyes could not be very long in obtaining the pre–eminence.
Citation :


Et aussi

Citation :
His happiness in knowing himself to have been so long the beloved of such a heart, must have been great enough to warrant any strength of language in which he could clothe it to her or to himself; it must have been a delightful happiness. But there was happiness elsewhere which no description can reach. Let no one presume to give the feelings of a young woman on receiving the assurance of that affection of which she has scarcely allowed herself to entertain a hope.

With so much true merit and true love, and no want of fortune and friends, the happiness of the married cousins must appear as secure as earthly happiness can be. Equally formed for domestic life, and attached to country pleasures, their home was the home of affection and comfort
Citation :


Emma:

Tell me, then, have I no chance of ever succeeding?"

He stopped in his earnestness to look the question, and the expression of his eyes overpowered her.

"My dearest Emma," said he, "for dearest you will always be, whatever the event of this hour's conversation, my dearest, most beloved Emma -- tell me at once. Say 'No,' if it is to be said." She could really say nothing. "You are silent," he cried, with great animation; "absolutely silent! at present I ask no more."

Emma was almost ready to sink under the agitation of this moment. The dread of being awakened from the happiest dream, was perhaps the most prominent feeling.

"I cannot make speeches, Emma," he soon resumed; and in a tone of such sincere, decided, intelligible tenderness as was tolerably convincing. "If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. You hear nothing but truth from me. I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it. Bear with the truths I would tell you now, dearest Emma, as well as you have borne with them. The manner, perhaps, may have as little to recommend them. God knows, I have been a very indifferent lover. But you understand me. Yes, you see, you understand my feelings -- and will return them if you can. At present, I ask only to hear, once to hear your voice."


Citation :
For a moment or two nothing was said, and she was unsuspicious of having excited any particular interest, till she found her arm drawn within his, and pressed against his heart, and heard him thus saying, in a tone of great sensibility, speaking low, "Time, my dearest Emma, time will heal the wound. -- Your own excellent sense -- your exertions for your father's sake -- I know you will not allow yourself. --" Her arm was pressed again, as he added, in a more broken and subdued accent, "The feelings of the warmest friendship -- Indignation -- Abominable scoundrel!" -- And in a louder, steadier tone, he concluded with, "He will soon be gone. They will soon be in Yorkshire. I am sorry for her. She deserves a better fate."

Emma understood him; and as soon as she could recover from the flutter of pleasure excited by such tender consideration, replied, "You are very kind -- but you are mistaken -- and I must set you right. -- I am not in want of that sort of compassion." ...

Persuasion: La lettre

NA:
Citation :
She was assured of his affection; and that heart in return was solicited, which, perhaps, they pretty equally knew was already entirely his own

Citation :
A very short visit to Mrs. Allen, in which Henry talked at random, without sense or connection, and Catherine, rapt in the contemplation of her own unutterable happiness, scarcely opened her lips, dismissed them to the ecstasies of another tete–a–tete

Je trouve ca genial qu'Henry qui a toujours ete si intelligent et sense se mette a parler sans "sense" parce qu'il a Catherine.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.austen33.monsite.wanadoo.fr
Anne Elliot
Sailor's Faithful Love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1901
Age : 24
Localisation : Montréal
Date d'inscription : 19/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Lun 8 Oct 2007 - 17:16

Personnellement, je ne trouve pas qu'il y a beaucoup de scènes romantiques dans l'oeuvre de Miss Austen. Je ne peux penser qu'à cette scène dans Emma que tu as citée, et à la lettre dans Persuasion.

Outre cela, Jane Austen a la fâcheuse manie de nous laisser sur notre faim aux moments les plus importants. Dans P&P, par exemple, au lieu d'un discours passioné de Darcy, on n'a que quelques lignes de dialogue, puis un he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.

Maintenant, je pour éviter les
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
cestoche
Riche célibataire
avatar

Nombre de messages : 100
Age : 27
Localisation : Région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 12/02/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Lun 15 Oct 2007 - 14:13

C'est vrai, mais je crois que c'est ça que j'apprécie chez elle! Very Happy
Toujours la mesure, pas de débordements d'affection, et pourtant on a conscience des sentiments des personnages, et on "vit" avec eux autant que si leurs sentiments étaient décortiqués dans tous les sens, et je ne trouve pas cela frustrant de ne pas avoir des scènes romantiques rapportées dans les moindres détails.
C'est comme si Jane nous disait à un moment donné "là, je vous passe là main, c'est votre imagination qui travaille. Wink "

Cela dit je dois avouer que la lettre de Persuasion... I love you drunken
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Angealyn
Passionate Heart


Nombre de messages : 6901
Age : 37
Localisation : Lost in Derbyshire
Date d'inscription : 29/08/2006

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Lun 15 Oct 2007 - 20:58

Dans Sense and Sensibility, il y a cette scène absolument géniale où le Colonel Brandon ramène une Marianne trempée jusqu'au os et très malade dans ses bras...

Dans Emma, je ne vois pas tellement...

Dans Pride and Prejudice: Honnêtement rien de terriblement romantique ne me vient à l'esprit pour le moment, en tout cas, pas une scène précise, sauf peut être celle de la demande en mariage sous la pluie (si on pense au film....), je trouve que toute l'histoire avec ses retournements, ses obstacles est romantique dans sa globalité et j'ai du mal à penser à une seule scène...

Les scènes les plus romantiques auquelles je pense sont dans Jane Eyre (mais ce n'est pas ici le topic adéquat pour en parler...)



voilà voilà... Je suis sure qu'il ya pleins de choses auxquelles je n'ai pas pensé mais celles ci sont les premières qui me sont venues à l'esprit


Dernière édition par le Mar 16 Oct 2007 - 8:11, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
cat47
Master of Thornfield
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23541
Age : 60
Localisation : Entre Salève et Léman
Date d'inscription : 28/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Lun 15 Oct 2007 - 22:20

Juste pour ne pas sombrer dans le HS, pourrait-on s'en tenir ici à Jane... Austen?

_________________
http://www.librarything.com/profile/catlamb
There are things so beautiful that they let you not mind that you will grow old and die.

Good angel of Prime Bright Loulou, lycanophila ma non seriosa
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Angealyn
Passionate Heart


Nombre de messages : 6901
Age : 37
Localisation : Lost in Derbyshire
Date d'inscription : 29/08/2006

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Mar 16 Oct 2007 - 8:10

My bad... Désolée quand je suis venue sur le topic, attirée par son titre, je n'avais pas vu qu'il s'agissait d'un topic particulier à Jane Austen... Désolée...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
christelle
The Gathering Storm
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3484
Age : 41
Localisation : Entre Paris, Londres, Hong Kong et Séoul...
Date d'inscription : 10/09/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Sam 3 Nov 2007 - 1:11

ah c'est terrible, mais la scène la plus romantique pour moi de S&S, c'est quand Marianne tombe et que Willoughby lui porte secours.
je vois la colline verte, la pluie, le cheval, Marianne dans sa robe claire, et Willoughby dans un grand manteau sombre, immense. study
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
AnneE
Pauvre gouvernante
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23
Age : 36
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 08/10/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Sam 3 Nov 2007 - 1:16

Pour moi :

Persuasion : la lettre !! (jai relue ce passage tant de fois Embarassed )

P&P : les deux demande en mariage (je sais cest pas original) et dans le film ou elle regarde par la porte entrouverte Mr Darcy et sa soeur

MP : A chaque fois que Henry Crowford faisait la cour à Fanny, je trouvais ça tellement romantique, et j'aurai tant aimé qu'elle lui dise oui.. ou que je lui dise oui Embarassed Embarassed

NA: le baiser qu'ils s'echangent (dans le film)

S&S : je vois pas
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Anne Elliot
Sailor's Faithful Love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1901
Age : 24
Localisation : Montréal
Date d'inscription : 19/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Sam 3 Nov 2007 - 18:58

C'est certain, dans les adaptation, il y a toujours des scenes terriblement romantiques et swoonantes. Mais dans les romans eux-mêmes, c'est un peu mois présent. Ce n'est peut-être pas une mauvaise chose au fond, cela nous permet d'imaginer ça par nous mêmes... ou de laisser les réalisateurs des films le faire pour nous Wink
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
francesco
Pauvre gouvernante


Nombre de messages : 19
Age : 37
Localisation : Parigi o mia cara
Date d'inscription : 19/01/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Sam 2 Fév 2008 - 11:59

Idem : la lettre dans Persuasion. Si c'est pas romantiqueonnné dans ce fil!) (au sens qui est d, je ne sais pas ce qu'il vous faut ! lol!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
anne shirley
Delights of Kindred Spirit
avatar

Nombre de messages : 4477
Age : 33
Localisation : on the road to Avonlea...
Date d'inscription : 01/01/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Sam 2 Fév 2008 - 12:10

Pour moi aussi, ce sera la lettre de Frederick dans Persuasion!
Comment de pas être touché par ce magnifique passage !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
lorelai59
Beautiful pianoforte
avatar

Nombre de messages : 636
Age : 33
Localisation : Lille
Date d'inscription : 03/07/2007

MessageSujet: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Jeu 21 Fév 2008 - 15:42

La lettre de Frederick est vraiment magnifique.
Je ne me lasse pas de la relire.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Nougatine
Lady of Zerzura
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2525
Age : 42
Localisation : Picardie
Date d'inscription : 17/11/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Jeu 21 Fév 2008 - 15:58

La lettre de Frederick à Anne dans Persuasion et tout le passage autour: la rédaction, la remise de la lettre, la lecture de la lettre et les retrouvailles.
Un moment merveilleux avec une telle tension pour Anne et pour lui que chaque fois que je relis ce passage je suis toute chose: j'imagine le coeur battant de Anne quand la porte s'ouvre et qu'il met en valeur la lettre, et Frederick l'angoisse qu'il doit ressentir car c'est son bonheur qui se joue dans cet instant...
C'est un sommet du romantisme chez Jane Austen pour moi .

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
laura p
Demande enflammée
avatar

Nombre de messages : 375
Age : 53
Localisation : entre Caen et Strasbourg
Date d'inscription : 09/02/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Jeu 21 Fév 2008 - 20:07

[ Very Happy Merci Nougatine, tout est là study





EDIT cat47, pour enlever la citation intégrale du post précédent
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
marie21
Lost in RA Sunbae
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17309
Age : 38
Localisation : somewhere near Taipei, Matsu Island, Seoul and Tokyo
Date d'inscription : 25/09/2006

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Jeu 21 Fév 2008 - 22:03

christelle a écrit:
ah c'est terrible, mais la scène la plus romantique pour moi de S&S, c'est quand Marianne tombe et que Willoughby lui porte secours.
je vois la colline verte, la pluie, le cheval, Marianne dans sa robe claire, et Willoughby dans un grand manteau sombre, immense. study
Moi aussi, j'aime beaucoup cette scène là! c'est vraiment très romantique! Sinon, je trouve que la 1ère demande en mariage dans Orgueil et Prejugés est romantique sur le fond, Darcy qui avoue d'un coup son amour pour Lizzie et puis ensuite le dialogue qui se transforme en dispute passionnée. J'aime beaucoup les échanges verbaux entre eux.
Jaime aussi la ème demande en mariage même si je suis frustrée par le style indirect du passage.

Dans Persuasion, la lettre de Wentworth est très romantique! les paroles D'Anne sur l'amour éternel sont très belles.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Meli
Héritier de Hamley Hall
avatar

Nombre de messages : 473
Age : 35
Date d'inscription : 03/10/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   Ven 22 Fév 2008 - 20:19



Pareil que AnneE, une des scènes des plus romantiques à mon sens, se trouve dans Mansfield Park : lorsque Henry Crawford passe rendre viste à Fanny dans sa famille à Portsmouth et qu'ils vont se promener par la suite.
Je n'avais jamais cru qu'il tiendrait promesse.
Ses manières sont si avenantes, sans etre "pot de colle", il fait abstraction de la situation de Fanny...J'adore ce moment qui ferait se fissurer le coeur le plus severe.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: La scene la plus romantique des romans   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
La scene la plus romantique des romans
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
The Inn at Lambton :: Do you read, Mr Darcy? :: Jane Austen :: Oeuvres et adaptations-
Sauter vers: