Une auberge pour les admirateurs de Jane Austen, et bien plus encore...
 
AccueilFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : 1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant
AuteurMessage
cat47
Master of Thornfield
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23548
Age : 60
Localisation : Entre Salève et Léman
Date d'inscription : 28/01/2006

MessageSujet: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mer 1 Fév 2006 - 15:18

Nous aimons tous, je pense, le style particulier de Jane Austen. On peut dire qu'avec elle, les formules font mouche. Alors je commence par une réplique de Darcy lors du bal à Merryton que j'adore, car sans faire de fioritures, elle nous met tout de suite en phase avec Lizzie et avec son appréciation de Darcy :

Donc parlant d'Eliza Bennett :
Citation :
"She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men."
Laughing Lizzie, cet homme n'est décidemment pas fréquentable!

EDIT : lorsque vous ajouterez vos phrases préférées, utilisez la fonction "Citer", cela donnera une meilleures lisibilité à vos messages.


Dernière édition par le Dim 5 Fév 2006 - 18:19, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Jafean
Delightful Quill
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2119
Age : 27
Localisation : Versailles
Date d'inscription : 02/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Jeu 2 Fév 2006 - 16:39

Ca va peut etre etre un peu long mais c'est tout de meme LA scene alors... Voici donc la premiere demande de Darcy prise dans le scripte de la version 95 :
Citation :

DARCY: (Agitated) In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

Elizabeth sits, astonished.

DARCY: In declaring myself thus, I am fully aware that I will be going expressly against the wishes of my family, my friends, and I hardly need add, my own better judgement.

Elizabeth is speechless.

DARCY: The relative situations of our families is such that any alliance between us must be regarded as a highly reprehensible connection. Indeed, as a rational man, I cannot but regard it as such myself. But it cannot be helped.

Elizabeth takes all this in.

DARCY: (He is still breathing hard) Almost from the very earliest moments of our acquaintance, I have come to feel for you a passionate admiration and regard which despite all my struggles has overcome every rational objection, and I beg you most fervently to relieve my suffering and consent to be my wife.

Elizabeth carefully schools her anger before she speaks.

ELIZABETH: In such cases as these, I believe the established mode is to express a sense of obligation. But I cannot.

Darcy looks at her, waiting to hear his fate, perhaps more confident than he should be in her answer.

ELIZABETH: I have never desired your good opinion, and you have certainly bestowed it most unwillingly. I am sorry to cause pain to anyone, but it was most unconsciously done, and I hope will be of short duration.

Darcy walks away from her, towards the mirror. He rubs his face, thinks for a moment, collects himself, and finally turns to face her.

DARCY: And this is all the reply I am to expect? (His emotions rise a little) I might wonder why with so little effort at civility I am rejected.
ELIZABETH: And I might wonder why with so evident a desire to offend and insult me you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character.

Darcy receives this reply, thinking about it.

ELIZABETH: Was this not some excuse for incivility if I was uncivil? I have every reason in the world to think ill of you. Do you think any consideration would tempt me to accept the man who has been the means of ruining the happiness of a most beloved sister? Can you deny that you have done it?
DARCY: I have no wish to deny it. I did everything in my power to separate my friend from your sister, and I rejoice in my success. Towards him I have been kinder than towards myself.
ELIZABETH: (Allowing more anger to rise) But it is not merely that on which my dislike of you is founded. Long before it had taken place, my dislike of you was decided when I heard Mr Wickham’s story of your dealings with him.

This causes a reaction from Darcy.

ELIZABETH: How can you defend yourself on that subject?
DARCY: (Bursting out, as he paces) You take an eager interest in that gentleman’s concerns!
ELIZABETH: (Also raising her voice) Who that knows what his misfortunes have been can help feeling an interest in him?
DARCY: (Still pacing, with a note of bitterness in his voice) His misfortunes! Yes, his misfortunes have been great indeed!
ELIZABETH: And of your infliction. You have reduced him to his present state of poverty, and yet you can treat his misfortunes with contempt and ridicule.

Darcy absorbs this.

DARCY: And this is your opinion of me? My faults by this calculation are heavy indeed.

He paces again, picks up his hat, pauses to consider, and approaches her.

DARCY: But perhaps these offences might have been overlooked had not your pride been hurt by the honest confession of the scruples which had long prevented my forming any serious design on you. Had I concealed my struggles, and flattered you. But disguise of every sort is my abhorrence. Nor am I ashamed of the feelings I related. They were natural and just. Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your connections?

Elizabeth gets up, and turns away from him, angry.

DARCY: To congratulate myself on the hope of relations whose condition in life is so decidedly below my own?

Elizabeth turns to face him. He intently absorbs everything she says, taking the blows she gives him.

ELIZABETH: (With rising forcefulness) You are mistaken, Mr Darcy. The mode of your declaration merely spared me any concern I might have felt in refusing you had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner. You could not have made me the offer of your hand in any possible way that would have tempted me to accept it. From the very beginning, your manners impressed me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain for the feelings of others. I had not known you a month before I felt you were the last man in the world whom I could ever marry.

They stare at each other.

DARCY: (Remaining calm, trying to put away his feelings) You have said quite enough, madam. I perfectly comprehend your feelings. And now have only to be ashamed of what my own have been. Please forgive me for having taken up your time, and -- accept my best wishes for your health and happiness
.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://jafean.deviantart.com
cat47
Master of Thornfield
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23548
Age : 60
Localisation : Entre Salève et Léman
Date d'inscription : 28/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Jeu 2 Fév 2006 - 17:08

Super que tu aies mis tout le script de la première déclaration. On peut y voir le génie du scénariste Andrew Davies, qui a su (ou a dû, puisque la scène était en partie en discours indirect dans le livre) complèter les répliques originales avec brio.

Je reprends le dialogue selon le livre :
Citation :
"In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you."

On a ensuite deux paragraphes sur les paroles exprimées par Darcy (mais en discours indirect, ce qui laisse de la place à l'imagination du scénariste) et les sentiments d'Elizabeth. Puis la réponse :

"In such cases as this, it is, I believe, the established mode to express a sense of obligation for the sentiments avowed, however unequally they may be returned. It is natural that obligation should be felt, and if I could feel gratitude, I would now thank you. But I cannot -- I have never desired your good opinion, and you have certainly bestowed it most unwillingly. I am sorry to have occasioned pain to any one. It has been most unconsciously done, however, and I hope will be of short duration. The feelings which, you tell me, have long prevented the acknowledgment of your regard, can have little difficulty in overcoming it after this explanation.''

``And this is all the reply which I am to have the honour of expecting! I might, perhaps, wish to be informed why, with so little endeavour at civility, I am thus rejected. But it is of small importance.''

``I might as well enquire,'' replied she, ``why, with so evident a design of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character? Was not this some excuse for incivility, if I was uncivil? But I have other provocations. You know I have. Had not my own feelings decided against you, had they been indifferent, or had they even been favourable, do you think that any consideration would tempt me to accept the man, who has been the means of ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a most beloved sister?''

As she pronounced these words, Mr. Darcy changed colour; but the emotion was short, and he listened without attempting to interrupt her while she continued.

``I have every reason in the world to think ill of you. No motive can excuse the unjust and ungenerous part you acted there. You dare not, you cannot deny that you have been the principal, if not the only means of dividing them from each other, of exposing one to the censure of the world for caprice and instability, the other to its derision for disappointed hopes, and involving them both in misery of the acutest kind.''

She paused, and saw with no slight indignation that he was listening with an air which proved him wholly unmoved by any feeling of remorse. He even looked at her with a smile of affected incredulity.

``Can you deny that you have done it?'' she repeated.

With assumed tranquillity he then replied, ``I have no wish of denying that I did every thing in my power to separate my friend from your sister, or that I rejoice in my success. Towards him I have been kinder than towards myself.''

Elizabeth disdained the appearance of noticing this civil reflection, but its meaning did not escape, nor was it likely to conciliate, her.

``But it is not merely this affair,'' she continued, ``on which my dislike is founded. Long before it had taken place, my opinion of you was decided. Your character was unfolded in the recital which I received many months ago from Mr. Wickham. On this subject, what can you have to say? In what imaginary act of friendship can you here defend yourself? or under what misrepresentation, can you here impose upon others?''

``You take an eager interest in that gentleman's concerns,'' said Darcy in a less tranquil tone, and with a heightened colour.

``Who that knows what his misfortunes have been, can help feeling an interest in him?''

``His misfortunes!'' repeated Darcy contemptuously; ``yes, his misfortunes have been great indeed.''

``And of your infliction,'' cried Elizabeth with energy. ``You have reduced him to his present state of poverty, comparative poverty. You have withheld the advantages, which you must know to have been designed for him. You have deprived the best years of his life, of that independence which was no less his due than his desert. You have done all this! and yet you can treat the mention of his misfortunes with contempt and ridicule.''

``And this,'' cried Darcy, as he walked with quick steps across the room, ``is your opinion of me! This is the estimation in which you hold me! I thank you for explaining it so fully. My faults, according to this calculation, are heavy indeed! But perhaps,'' added he, stopping in his walk, and turning towards her, ``these offences might have been overlooked, had not your pride been hurt by my honest confession of the scruples that had long prevented my forming any serious design. These bitter accusations might have been suppressed, had I with greater policy concealed my struggles, and flattered you into the belief of my being impelled by unqualified, unalloyed inclination -- by reason, by reflection, by every thing. But disguise of every sort is my abhorrence. Nor am I ashamed of the feelings I related. They were natural and just. Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your connections? To congratulate myself on the hope of relations, whose condition in life is so decidedly beneath my own?''

Elizabeth felt herself growing more angry every moment; yet she tried to the utmost to speak with composure when she said,

``You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared me the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentleman-like manner.''

She saw him start at this, but he said nothing, and she continued,

``You could not have made me the offer of your hand in any possible way that would have tempted me to accept it.''

Again his astonishment was obvious; and he looked at her with an expression of mingled incredulity and mortification. She went on.

``From the very beginning, from the first moment I may almost say, of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form that ground-work of disapprobation, on which succeeding events have built so immoveable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.''

``You have said quite enough, madam. I perfectly comprehend your feelings, and have now only to be ashamed of what my own have been. Forgive me for having taken up so much of your time, and accept my best wishes for your health and happiness.''

And with these words he hastily left the room, and Elizabeth heard him the next moment open the front door and quit the house.
Je comprends que tu aies mis toute la scène, car vraiment, c'est le coeur du livre, et chaque phrase sonne extrêmement bien. Alors pas la peine d'extraire les meilleures, elles sont toutes réussies.

Ce qu'on voit également, c'est que Davies a repris certains passages tels quels, qu'il en a modernisé d'autres et qu'il en a inventés certains, mais qu'il reconstitue parfaitement la tension entre les deux personnages.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Jafean
Delightful Quill
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2119
Age : 27
Localisation : Versailles
Date d'inscription : 02/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Jeu 2 Fév 2006 - 18:03

Super! Ce petit parallele est tres sympa ! Wink
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://jafean.deviantart.com
cat47
Master of Thornfield
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23548
Age : 60
Localisation : Entre Salève et Léman
Date d'inscription : 28/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Dim 5 Fév 2006 - 19:11

Un autre passage que j'adore, lorsque Sir Lucas s'adresse à Darcy :

Citation :
There is nothing like dancing after all. I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished societies of the world.
Et Darcy de répondre :

Citation :
Every savage can dance.
Repris dans la version BBC 95, malheureusement pas dans la version 2005.



Juste pour inaugurer mon petit smiley!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Marie_94
Manteau de Darcy
avatar

Nombre de messages : 65
Localisation : Bry sur Marne
Date d'inscription : 07/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mer 8 Fév 2006 - 15:26

Comme je ne sais pas trop dans quelle catégorie rentre ma question j'ai trouvé que celle-ci était celle qui correspondait le mieux: Est-ce que quelqu'un connaitrait un site ou saurait-il où je pourrais me procurer le script de P&P de 2005 ( en anglais bien-sûr^^)
Merci d'avance!! Very Happy
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Muezza
Almost Unearthly Thing
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3230
Age : 43
Localisation : Levallois
Date d'inscription : 29/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mer 8 Fév 2006 - 15:50

Moi aussi je pense me le procurer car il semble que beaucoup de choses aient été modifiée par rapport à la version initiale du scenario. Notamment la fin reprenait initialement le dialogue finaldu livre entre Lizzie et Darcy. Quel dommage ! N'y aura-t-on donc jamais droit ?

Le site mentionné sur www.imdb.com est :
[url]
http://www.scriptcity.com/details.asp?search=pride&ID=16488 [/url]
Ce n'est pas la dernière version du script (celui-ci est date de février 2004)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Jafean
Delightful Quill
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2119
Age : 27
Localisation : Versailles
Date d'inscription : 02/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mer 8 Fév 2006 - 15:52

Merci pour le lien !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://jafean.deviantart.com
Marie_94
Manteau de Darcy
avatar

Nombre de messages : 65
Localisation : Bry sur Marne
Date d'inscription : 07/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mer 8 Fév 2006 - 15:57

Merci beaucoup!! Seulement je ne pensais pas que ça serait payant...lol
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Muezza
Almost Unearthly Thing
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3230
Age : 43
Localisation : Levallois
Date d'inscription : 29/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mer 8 Fév 2006 - 15:59

Dans ce cas tu peux aller sur le topic imdb.com. Il ya de nombreux passages qui y sont repris (et critiqués) dans les différents posts.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0414387/board/thread/34889427
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Marie_94
Manteau de Darcy
avatar

Nombre de messages : 65
Localisation : Bry sur Marne
Date d'inscription : 07/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mer 8 Fév 2006 - 16:08

Je vais de ce pas jeter un coup d'oeil!! Merci pour ta précieuse aide!! Wink
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
cat47
Master of Thornfield
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23548
Age : 60
Localisation : Entre Salève et Léman
Date d'inscription : 28/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Jeu 9 Fév 2006 - 11:34

Après la discussion que nous avons eue sur la fin américaine du film, il fallait tout de même que je mette ici la réplique de Mr Bennet directement tirée du livre et qui termine si joliment le film dans sa version anglaise:

Citation :
If any young men come for Mary and Kitty, send them in, for I am quite at leisure.

Il faut dire qu'en plus, l'expression de Donald Sutherland est tellement magnifique à ce moment! Cela met en valeur le génie de notre Jane pour affiner les portraits de ses personnages par quelques touches légères.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
eliza
Pauvre gouvernante
avatar

Nombre de messages : 22
Date d'inscription : 08/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Jeu 9 Fév 2006 - 18:50

EDIT Cat 47 : merci Eliza d'avoir repris cette discussion dans le sujet des traductions. Je laisse donc ici la magnifique phrase de Lizzie en vo :
Citation :
You are mistaken,Mr Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared me the concern which I migth have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner.

et la traduction de La Pléiade :
Citation :
Vous avez tort de croire le contraire, monsieur Darcy, mais la forme de votre déclaration m'a épargné la compassion que j'aurais peut-être éprouvée en refusant votre main, si vous aviez plus agi en gentleman
ainsi que ton commentaires :
Une de mes citations préférées car elle induit chez Darcy une profonde réflexion qui va finalement l'aider à s'améliorer (juste la forme pas le fond) et conquérir son Elizabeth. lol!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
eliza
Pauvre gouvernante
avatar

Nombre de messages : 22
Date d'inscription : 08/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Jeu 9 Fév 2006 - 20:17

Une citation de Lizzie (en discussion avec Jane) dans P&P1995:

Citation :
I know I shall probably never see him again. I cannot bear to think that he is alive in the world and thinking ill of me.

Un rajout par rapport au livre mais tellement à propos pour traduire toutes les réflexions de l'héroïne et ainsi rendre visible l'évolution du personnage.
Et le jeu de Jennifer Ehle: parfait.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Muezza
Almost Unearthly Thing
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3230
Age : 43
Localisation : Levallois
Date d'inscription : 29/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Dim 12 Fév 2006 - 20:40

Je ne peux ne pas poster la réplique mémorable de Lady Catherine de Bourgh, un concentré du génie Austenien :
Citation :
"There are few people in England, I suppose, who have more true enjoyment of music than myself, or a better natural taste. If I had ever learnt, I should have been a great proficien
ce qui donne en français chez 10/18,
Citation :
"Je crois vraiment qu'il y a peu de personnnes en Angleterre qui aiment la musique autant que moi, ou l'apprécient avec plus de goût naturel. J'aurais eu sans doute beaucoup de talent, si je lavais apprise"
C'est irresistiblement DROLE et taille son portrait immédiatement ! D'ailleurs, que Lady Catherine reproche à Lizzie de ne pas avoir appris la musique, alors que c'est justement son cas propre, est un peu troublant , ne trouvez-vous pas ?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
cat47
Master of Thornfield
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23548
Age : 60
Localisation : Entre Salève et Léman
Date d'inscription : 28/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Dim 12 Fév 2006 - 21:38

J'adore. C'est tellement représentatif de Jane Austen. Elle nous fait rire, elle croque le personnage en deux temps trois mouvements et l'élégance de la langue est sans concurrence.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
cat47
Master of Thornfield
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23548
Age : 60
Localisation : Entre Salève et Léman
Date d'inscription : 28/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Lun 13 Fév 2006 - 23:34

Et puisque l'on parlait de subtil compliment dans une autre partie de ce forum, pourquoi ne pas reprendre la très jolie sortie de Darcy après une remarque de Caroline Bingley, lors de la soirée chez les Lucas :
Citation :
My mind was more agreably engaged. I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow."
Traduction 10/18 :
Citation :
Mes réflexions étaient beaucoup plus agréables : je songeais seulement au grand plaisir que peuvent donner deux beaux yeux dans le visage d'une jolie femme.

Simple mais charmant. Thank you, Mr Darcy!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Miss Smith
Intendante de Pemberley
avatar

Nombre de messages : 597
Age : 30
Localisation : Région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 08/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mar 14 Fév 2006 - 17:59

Excuse moi de citer cat47 mais c'est tout a fais ce que je pense à propos cette phrase : "Simple mais charmant".
Et puis c'etais bien fait pour cette Miss Bingley!!

C'est ce qui fait qu'on lui pardonne tout à ce Mr. Darcy, même ce qu'il avait dabord dit à propos de Lizzy. Je crois que si elle l'avait entendu à ce moment là, elle l'aurait epousé surr le champ! enfin c'est ce que j'aurai fait moi lol. Mais bon heusement pour nous je ne suis pas Lizzy Bennet, sinon l'histoire aurait été incroyablement courte!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
eliza
Pauvre gouvernante
avatar

Nombre de messages : 22
Date d'inscription : 08/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mar 14 Fév 2006 - 18:45

Et cette phrase si surprenante car il (Darcy) est, je crois, on ne peut plus sincère (surtout quand on le voit en train de la dire avec un de ces regard silent ) juste après avoir reçu un refus aussi incisif Evil or Very Mad C'est vraiment caractéristique d'un héros austinien sunny

Citation :
Forgive me for having taken up so much of your time, and accept my best wishes for your health and happiness.

On a presque la petite larme pour lui. Sad
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Faustine
Chemise mouillée
avatar

Nombre de messages : 414
Age : 25
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 15/02/2006

MessageSujet: phrases favorites   Mer 15 Fév 2006 - 13:34

Moi aussi ça va peut-être être un peu long, mais bon ... outre les phrases que vous avez mises (et que j'apprécie beaucoup aussi... Embarassed ), j'aime particulièrement le passage avec miss Bingley et Mr Darcy lorsqu'il écrit sa lettre :
Citation :
-Comme miss Darcy sera contente de recevoir une si longue lettre!
Point de réponse.
-Vous écrivez vraiment avec une rapidité merveilleuse.
-Erreur. J'écris plutôt lentement.
-Vous direz à votre soeur qu'il me tarde beaucoup de la voir.
-Je lui ai dit déjà une fois à votre prière.
-Votre plume grince! Passez-la-moi. J'ai un talent spécial pou tailler les plumes.
-Je vous remercie, mais c'est une chose que je fais toujours moi-même.
-Comment pouvez-vous écrire si régulièrement ?
-...
-Dites à votre soeur que j'ai été enchantée d'apprendre les progrès qu'elle a faits sur la harpe. Dites-lui aussi que son petit croquis m'a plongée dans le ravissement : il est beaucoup plus réussi que celui de miss Grantley.
-Me permettez-vous de réserver pour ma prochaine lettre l'expression de votre ravissement? Actuellement, il ne me reste plus de place.
-Oh! Cela n'a pas d'importance. Je verai du reste votre soeur en janvier. Lui écrivez-vous chaque fois d'aussi longues et charmantes missives, Mr Darcy?
-Longues, oui ; charmantes, ce n'est pas à moi de les juger telles.
-A mon avis, des lettres écrites avec autant de facilité sont toujours agréables.
-Votre compliment tombe à faux, Caroline! darcy n'écrit pas avec facilité! Il recherche trop les mots savants, les mots de quatre syllabes, n'est-ce pas , Darcy?

Oui, je sais, j'ai recopiéle texte en français (quelle fainéante je suis !

Sleep )
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MissEliza
Lady à la rescousse
avatar

Nombre de messages : 316
Date d'inscription : 07/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Ven 17 Fév 2006 - 17:30

et que pensez-vous de celles-ci :
EDIT Muezza : ces répliques sont issues de l'adaptation 2005

"I would easily forgice his vaniity, had he not wounded mine." vexée ? (dans le livre : "I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine")
"dancing, even if one's partenair is barely tolerable" et vlan dans les dents...
" he's so... he's so..." "so what ?" "he's so rich !" évidemment, ça coule de source, cela ne peut être !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Cécile
Ville du Nord...
avatar

Nombre de messages : 736
Age : 28
Localisation : Gif sur Yvette région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 14/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mar 21 Fév 2006 - 13:29

Citation :
I do not have the talent to conversing easily with people I've never met before
C'est marrant ce point commun que j'ai avec Darcy
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://cecilou.blogs-de-voyage.fr
Smo
Extensive reading
avatar

Nombre de messages : 232
Localisation : Région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 16/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Mar 21 Fév 2006 - 13:44

J'aime bien toutes les répliques que vous avez posté.
Il y en a une dans le film qui me revient quand Jane souhaite qu'Elizabeth rencontre un homme qui lui plaira autant que Mr Bingley lui plait à elle.
Elizabeth:
Perhaps Mr Collins has a cousin
De la répartie et de l'humour quoi qu'il arrive de la part d'Elizabeth.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MissEliza
Lady à la rescousse
avatar

Nombre de messages : 316
Date d'inscription : 07/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Sam 25 Fév 2006 - 10:30

Cecile : bienvenue au club !
je suis pareille : grande timide, quand je suis en nouvelle compagnie, je reste silencieuse et j'observe mes interlocuteurs...
J'entends dire des personnes qui ne me connaissent pas qu'elles me trouvent sévère et distante...
En lisant le livre et en regardant le film, je me suis rendue compte à travers Darcy à quel point cette perception pouvait être vraie : comme Darcy, je fais des efforts mais c'est pas toujours évident !
Une fois en terrain conquis c'est l'inverse : Lizzy remplace Darcy, ou plus tôt "complète Darcy !!! Very Happy
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Cécile
Ville du Nord...
avatar

Nombre de messages : 736
Age : 28
Localisation : Gif sur Yvette région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 14/02/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   Sam 25 Fév 2006 - 10:35

MissEliza a écrit:

Une fois en terrain conquis c'est l'inverse : Lizzy remplace Darcy, ou plus tôt "complète Darcy !!! Very Happy

Alors on est vraiment pareil, face aux personnes que je ne connais pas je suis vraiment muette comme une carpe silent et je parai assez froide.
Mais chez moi je suis un vrai moulin à paroles exitée comme une puce lol!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://cecilou.blogs-de-voyage.fr
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 4Aller à la page : 1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Orgueil et Préjugés : petites (ou grandes) phrases préférées
» Orgueil et Préjugés adapté au théatre par la compagnie Les Petites Cuillères
» Petites et grandes phrases...
» Orgueil et Préjugés et Zombies - Seth Grahame-Smith
» [O'Donnell, Cassandra] Les soeurs Charbrey - Tome 1: Sans orgueil ni préjugé

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
The Inn at Lambton :: Do you read, Mr Darcy? :: Jane Austen :: Oeuvres et adaptations :: Pride and Prejudice :: P&P de Jane Austen-
Sauter vers: